What You Need to Know When Working Remotely

Much has been written about the digital workplace. Some remaine tethered to the past and insist on workers being in office five days a week. I actually know of one Silicon Valley-based technology company that assigns “work monitors” to take roll every day, verifying and reporting if a worker was at her or his desk at 9 a.m. every morning and at 5 p.m. every afternoon. It should come as no surprise that the company’s stock hovers at single digits, and it struggles to retain and recruit quality workers.

Yet, despite laggards such as the aforementioned company, many companies recognize the power of offer their workers flexible work options (remote entirely and hybrid scenarios). And solopreneurs and small businesses are at the forefront when it comes to adoption of the digital workplace. The benefits have been documented by numerous studies. Some of the most prominent findings include:

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How to Be Successful When Working Remotely

Remote work has risen in popularity over the past couple of years as technology has made it easier for professionals to work from anywhere, at any time. The number of freelancers and self-employed professionals has likewise increased, and flexible work options have become one of the most coveted benefits workers seek from a company.

While some remote workers might choose to work from home, others find it beneficial to work from a serviced workspace or a coffee shop. Still, regardless of whether you are self-employed or part of a company team and you are working remotely, in order to be successful as a remote worker, it is extremely important that you always present yourself in a professional manner. Here are four way to be successful while working remotely.

  1. Keep your team and clients updated at all times

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Coworking Office Space & Workspace On Demand: How They Are Changing The Game For Business Professionals

Having a workspace is crucial to being productive. Whether you’re building handmade furniture or building a corporate empire, you need someplace where you can get to work. It’s almost like a second home. That’s likely part of the reason why, when you don’t have a workspace, you feel a little homeless.

In the past, companies large and small have shelled out thousands to lease office spaces, and even more to buy or build their own. It was an unavoidable part of the package deal: if you wanted to work, you needed a place to do it, and you needed space for all the people who would work with you. Those who couldn’t afford the floor space had to work out of their own homes and looked a lot less legitimate to their clients back then because of it.

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How to Pick the Right Temporary Office to Fit Your Needs

Solopreneurs and small businesses are learning that permanent office space is no longer a requisite. They can use virtual address solutions to secure professional locations, for both their headquarters office as well as regional offices, that convey the right brand image.

When they need day offices, coworking spaces, and conference rooms, solopreneurs and small businesses can simply use temporary rented space. Though other use cases could be cited, the following are the more prevalent:

  1. Office time.

    Working in an office setting affords solopreneurs and small business professionals with a chance to interact with other like-minded solopreneurs and small business professionals. This stimulates collaborative thinking and helps users to focus their attention on work-related tasks. Coworking spaces are great fits in these scenarios, though day offices can be the right choice in some cases. They also come with other services such as dog walking, on-site message therapists, upscale lounges, and other perks.

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Thwarting the Security Perils of Public Wi-Fi

The workforce is evolving quickly and becoming increasingly more mobile—for both big and small companies. Technological advances enable employees to access company information and to do their jobs from virtually anywhere. One outcome is that workplaces and work spaces are being remade, with some companies getting rid of permanent work space altogether and electing to use co working space, day offices, and rented conference rooms.

The forecast is that this work space evolution will continue. IDC predicts that the U.S. mobile workforce population will grow to over 105 million workers by 2020, accounting for nearly three-quarters of the total workforce. Mobile work takes different forms and occurs from different places.

Some mobile work is done from home offices, while other work is done from rented meeting space and day offices. In these cases, workers access the Internet through private Wi-Fi that is gated and reduces the possibilities of security hacking. But other mobile work is done from coffee shops, public transport, libraries, and other places where public Wi-Fi access is the norm. Growing numbers of cities even offer free Wi-Fi access in downtown areas and other locations.

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Mobile Apps SEO: A complete guide for App Owners

In today’s business world, it is important to have an app. We may understand search engine optimization – or SEO. However, app owners who apply this knowledge can easily create one that improves visibility, which will increase business. As you will see, applying SEO knowledge to apps may take some tweaks.  But, the rewards are plentiful.

Getting Ranked In SERPs

Using website SEO has become common. However, according to searchengineland.com, anyone who understands how to create good search engine optimization to get mobile apps ranked will improve their business. After all, good SEO increases your search engine results page (SERP) ranking. These pages are the results of your search terms.  Whatever search engine you use, you will see similar results based on rankings.

In order to help you increase your chances of your app getting higher on the SERPs, there are several things you can do:

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The Organizational Art of Getting Things Done

I’m overloaded. There’s way too many demands on me in comparison to the number of hours in a day. At the same time, I’m committed to eating right and sleeping well—and not burning out. In other words, I’ve learned that burning the candle at both ends does not a long-term successful business make.

That’s why I’m reading a book right now that’s absolutely changing my life—not just my business life but my entire life. It’s called Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity.

David Allen penned a time-management method that is more suitable for the modern age in which we live. Admittedly, the Getting Things Done (GTD) model is challenging at times to apply but will set your brain free to create and execute on more than you ever thought possible if you adopt it.

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6 Ideas to “Declutter” Your Small Businesses

Cluttered Personal and Professional Lives

It’s easy for a small business to become overwhelmed with blocking-and-tackling tactics and unable to focus on strategic initiatives. The to-do list is almost endless and can become paralyzing. A recent survey finds the average worker spends less than half their time on their primary job function. The rest of the time is spent on meetings, administrative work, answering calls, and other tasks.

This creates immense pressure on small business leaders who are under pressure to perform, and time is one of the biggest challenges. A study conducted by Sage found that almost half work 40 to 60 hours per week, with 16 percent working more than 60.

The impact of having a “cluttered” professional life also impacts the personal lives of small business leaders. A recent survey by Simply Business reveals:

  • Half cancel social plans once a week

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Dreaming of a startup- We have some Shark Tank Tips for You

Building your own startup isn’t an easy process. If anyone tells you different, they aren’t being honest. There are an enormous number of variables at play, and unfortunately sometimes luck isn’t on your side.

Between funding, market health, brand awareness, staffing, and consumer recognition, building a company from the ground up is always a gamble. The hard data tells the same story. Depending on your definition of success, anywhere from 40-90 percent of startups fail.

So why then, is entrepreneurship on the rise?

Well, independence for one. The ability to control your own destiny is very appealing to many Americans. Then there’s the 10-60 percent of startups that actually succeed. These are the companies glorified on investor television programs such as Shark Tank.

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The Power and Value of Showing Appreciation to Clients

Let’s face it, BCs and Serviced Workspaces are smack dab in the middle of the High-Hospitality industry — and in fact it’s the highest of the High-Hospitality business models since it serves its clients for days, weeks, months and years on-end. This is not just for an hour, or a day or two here-and-there, such as what Hotels, Car Rental agencies, airlines, restaurants and even resorts like Disney do.

And with the territory of being the premier High-Hospitality industry comes the responsibility to show appreciation at any, and every turn. It’s more than just providing service — more than fielding and fulfilling customer service requirements. ‘Hospitality’ requires initiating a friendly interaction. It’s pro-active, whereas customer service is re-active. It’s extending a helping hand or compliment, and not waiting for the client, guest, tenant, member or neighbor to initiate or be left hanging expecting it. And the centerpiece … the fuel that drives the engine of an ongoing, fruitful, professional, winning relationship at any business, and especially at a High-Hospitality business such as at a Business Center or Serviced Workspace — is demonstrating appreciation.

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